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A Case of Scientific Skullduggery

February 6, 2012 by
Filed under: LitNews, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle 

Sir Arthur Conan DoyleIn 1912 there was an announcement that rocked the scientific world.  The remains of an early form of man had been found in the British village of Piltdown.  It was exciting because Piltdown Man was much different from his Cro-Magnon and Neanderthal cousins.  He had an enormous brain.  A large tool that looked kind of like a cricket bat was  found near the skull fragments.  Piltdown Man was certainly one of a kind.

It turns out that the reason Piltdown Man was so different is because the artifacts were forged.

In 1953 it was proven that the artifacts were actually the skull of a modern human and  the jawbone of an orangutan or chimpanzee.  Now only one mystery remains.  Who perpetrated the hoax?

It seems likely that Charles Dawson, the man who first found the remains, was in on the scheme.  Dawson, nicknamed the Wizard of  Sussex, was famous for his archeological finds.  However Dawson’s discoveries have not stood the test of time.

Dr Miles Russell of Bournemouth University studied Dawson’s collection.  In 2003 Russell declared that at least 38 specimens were fakes. He further stated that Dawson’s  career was “built upon deceit, sleight of hand, fraud and deception, the ultimate gain being international recognition”

But did Dawson act alone?  Sir Arhtur Conan Doyle has always been suspected of assisting Dawson.  As a doctor Conan Doyle had the means to create the forged artifacts.  As a Spiritualist he may have also had the motive to take a jab at the scientific community.

In a few weeks British researchers are going to study the remains of Piltdown Man.  Their objective will be to find out everything they can about the artifacts and hopefully discover who took part in the fraud.

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