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Bram Stoker a Late Bloomer?

April 22, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

Bram Stoker 1906April 20th marked 100 years since the death of Bram Stoker, the author of Dracula.

An interesting fact about Stoker is that he was a late bloomer in terms of his writing career.  His work history included theater critic, civil servant and 27 years spent as the manager of the Lyceum Theater in London.  Stoker didn’t publish Dracula until he was fifty years old.

Then a dog began to howl somewhere in a farmhouse far down the road, a long, agonized wailing, as if from fear. The sound was taken up by another dog, and then another and another, till, borne on the wind which now sighed softly through the Pass, a wild howling began, which seemed to come from all over the country, as far as the imagination could grasp it through the gloom of the night. ~ Dracula by Bram Stoker


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Conan Doyle, George Bernard Shaw and the Titanic

April 14, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle 

Sir Arthur Conan DoyleTomorrow marks the 100th anniversary of the sinking of the Titanic.

Most of us are familiar with the story.  In 1912, on its maiden voyage, the ocean liner struck an iceberg and sank.   Because there were not enough lifeboats over 1,500 lives were lost.

A little-known fact is that after the disaster Conan Doyle and George Bernard Shaw had a very public disagreement about how the disaster was characterized in the press.

You can read the full story about the dispute at our partner site, The Chronicles of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.

Noteworthy Link – Classic Book Club

April 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Noteworthy Links 

Noteworthy Link
When I saw the Classic Book Club site my first thought was, “Why haven’t I heard about this before?”  My second thought was, “What a great idea for a site.  I wish I would have thought of it.”

The site is filled with book reviews.  The reviews aren’t scholarly.  Instead they’re the opinions of someone reading the stories for pleasure.  Did they like it?  What part of the novel appealed to them?  I found it refreshing to find other people who think that classic literature can be fun to read.

 

Happy Easter!

April 8, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Sir Arthur Conan Doyle 

daffodil

It was an ideal spring day, a light blue sky, flecked with little fleecy white clouds drifting across from west to east. The sun was shining very brightly, and yet there was an exhilarating nip in the air, which set an edge to a man’s energy. ~ The Adventure of the Copper Beeches by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

New Quotes!

March 13, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens, Site News 

Charles DickensYesterday I added 27 Barnaby Rudge quotes to the site. My favorite quote of the new batch is:

She had found her heart at last. Never having known its worth till now, she had never known the worth of his. ~ Barnaby Rudge by Charles Dickens

Other LitQuotes Features

  • Random Quote – Shakespeare? Dickens? Austen? What quote will you get?
  • Random Love Quote – It’s all about love on the random love quote page.
  • Random Funny Quote – Need a laugh? Check out the random funny quote.
  • Random Spooky Quote – You’ll get the shivers! View a random spooky quote from our large collection of scary quotes.

 

Ten Facts About Lewis Carroll

March 12, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

The folks at Abe Books have put together a fun video about Lewis Carroll, the author of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

Dr. Joan Watson? Why it’s Elementary!

Sherlock Holmes No doubt noticing the popularity of the Sherlock Holmes movies and the BBC’s Sherlock, CBS is planing to launch a TV show based on the Sherlock Holmes stories.  It’s early days, but some details have been announced.

  • The tentative title of the show is Elementary.
  • Jonny Lee Miller (Trainspotting, Dexter) will be playing the role of Sherlock Holmes.
  • Lucy Liu (Ally McBeal, Charlie’s Angels) will be playing the role of Dr. Joan Watson.

 

New Quotes!

February 19, 2012 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: Site News 

LitQuotesI’ve added new quotes to the collection!  New titles include:

My favorite quote of the new batch is:

As the gambler said of his dice, to love and win is the best thing, to love and lose is the next best. ~ The History of Pendennis by William Makepeace Thackeray

Other LitQuotes Features

  • Random Quote – Shakespeare? Dickens? Austen? What quote will you get?
  • Random Love Quote – It’s all about love on the random love quote page.
  • Random Funny Quote – Need a laugh? Check out the random funny quote.
  • Random Spooky Quote – You’ll get the shivers! View a random spooky quote from our large collection of scary quotes.

 

Jack London’s Vision of 2012

February 17, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

Jack LondonI’m reading The Scarlet Plague by Jack London.  (pictured on the left)  It’s a post-apocalyptic novel written published in 1912.  The Scarlet Plague is available for free from Project Gutenberg and Amazon.

The novel has presented two shocks so far.  The first one was that the author of White Fang and Call of the Wild also wrote science fiction.  I received my second shock when I read the details of the apocalypse.   In the world of The Scarlet Plague we don’t have much time left.

“2012,” he shrilled, and then fell to cackling grotesquely. “That was the year Morgan the Fifth was appointed President of the United States by the Board of Magnates. It must have been one of the last coins minted, for the Scarlet Death came in 2013. Lord! Lord!—think of it!”

The Voice of Virginia Woolf

February 16, 2012 by · 2 Comments
Filed under: Everything Else 

This audio recording, set to a series of photos, is said to be the only recording of Virginia Woolf’s voice. The recording is from a BBC radio broadcast in 1937.

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