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Merry Christmas!

December 25, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

CandyCanes I’d like to take this opportunity to wish you and yours a happy holiday season!

Oh, a wonderful pudding! Bob Cratchit said, and calmly too, that he regarded it as the greatest success achieved by Mrs. Cratchit since their marriage. Mrs. Cratchit said that now the weight was off her mind, she would confess she had had her doubts about the quantity of flour. Everybody had something to say about it, but nobody said or thought it was at all a small pudding for a large family. It would have been flat heresy to do so. Any Cratchit would have blushed to hint at such a thing. ~  A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

 

A Christmas Carol Video

December 19, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens 

Here’s a scene from my favorite version of A Christmas Carol. It’s the 1970 version starring Albert Finney.


Christmas Quotes from Literature

December 12, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens, Site News 

stocking
It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas at my house.  The tree is almost decorated.  We’re sending Christmas cards out on Friday and the shopping is progressing nicely.   All of this has put me in the holiday spirit.  So I thought I’d share some of my favorite quotes from the LitQuotes Christmas quotations collection.

Heap on more wood!–the wind is chill;
But let it whistle as it will,
We’ll keep our Christmas merry still.

Marmion by Sir Walter Scott

It is, indeed, the season of regenerated feeling–the season for kindling, not merely the fire of hospitality in the hall, but the genial flame of charity in the heart.
Old Christmas by Washington Irving

“Christmas isn’t a season. It’s a feeling.”
 ~ Roast Beef, Medium by Edna Ferber

“I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach. Oh, tell me I may sponge away the writing on this stone!” ~  A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

 

Ask Srcrooge a Question

November 12, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens 

Scrooge
Our partner site, Charles Dickens Gad’s Hill Place, has a fun feature that you may enjoy.  Go there to ask Ebenezer Scrooge a yes or no question.    And if you’re a Scrooge fan, check out our gift shop for Scrooge clothing, mugs and more.

Darkness is cheap, and Scrooge liked it.
  A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens


Christmas Pudding

December 19, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens 

Christmas TreeOh, a wonderful pudding! Bob Cratchit said, and calmly too, that he regarded it as the greatest success achieved by Mrs. Cratchit since their marriage. Mrs. Cratchit said that now the weight was off her mind, she would confess she had had her doubts about the quantity of flour. Everybody had something to say about it, but nobody said or thought it was at all a small pudding for a large family. It would have been flat heresy to do so. Any Cratchit would have blushed to hint at such at such a thing. ~  A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

For any adventurous cooks out there that want to make their own Christmas pudding, here’s a recipe from The Book Of Household Management by Mrs. Isabella Beeton, published in installments between 1859 and 1861.

CHRISTMAS PLUM-PUDDING.

 INGREDIENTS.—1-1/2 lb. of raisins, 1/2 lb. of currants, 1/2 lb. of mixed peel, 3/4 lb. of bread crumbs, 3/4 lb. of suet, 8 eggs, 1 wineglassful of brandy.

Mode.—Stone and cut the raisins in halves, but do not chop them; wash, pick, and dry the currants, and mince the suet finely; cut the candied peel into thin slices, and grate down the bread into fine crumbs. When all these dry ingredients are prepared, mix them well together; then moisten the mixture with the eggs, which should be well beaten, and the brandy; stir well, that everything may be very thoroughly blended, and press the pudding into a buttered mould; tie it down tightly with a floured cloth, and boil for 5 or 6 hours. It may be boiled in a cloth without a mould, and will require the same time allowed for cooking. As Christmas puddings are usually made a few days before they are required for table, when the pudding is taken out of the pot, hang it up immediately, and put a plate or saucer underneath to catch the water that may drain from it. The day it is to be eaten, plunge it into boiling water, and keep it boiling for at least 2 hours; then turn it out of the mould, and serve with brandy-sauce. On Christmas-day a sprig of holly is usually placed in the middle of the pudding, and about a wineglassful of brandy poured round it, which, at the moment of serving, is lighted, and the pudding thus brought to table encircled in flame.

Time.—5 or 6 hours the first time of boiling; 2 hours the day it is to be served.

Average cost, 4s.

Sufficient for a quart mould for 7 or 8 persons.

Seasonable on the 25th of December, and on various festive occasions till March.

If the above looks a little complicated, here’s a modern version of a Christmas pudding recipe.

Holy Christmas Carol, Batman!

October 27, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens, LitQuotes in Comics 

Batman: NoelOn November 8th DC Comics is going to release Batman: Noel.  In this graphic novel the Dark Knight looks at his past, present and future.  (Hmmm . . . does this sound like any Dickens character we know?)  Robin, Catwoman, Superman and The Joker all take part in this journey.

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