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Quotes About Communication

August 17, 2017 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Quote Topics 

Communication Quotes

The site has a large collection of literary quotes about communication.  These are some of my favorites.

In reality they all lived in a kind of hieroglyphic world, where the real thing was never said or done or even thought, but only represented by a set of arbitrary signs. ~ The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

“Old men only lie in wait for people to ask them to talk. Then they rattle on like a rusty elevator wheezing up a shaft.” ~ Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury

Often I must speak other than I think. That is called diplomacy. ~ Dune Messiah by Frank Herbert

“With no intention to take offence, I deny your right to put words into my mouth.” ~ Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. ~ The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins

“Words,” said the host, at length, “is worse’n bullets. You never know what they’ll hit.” ~ The Night Horseman by Max Brand

Fair speech may hide a foul heart. ~ The Two Towers by J. R. R. Tolkien

We are never half so interesting when we have learned that language is given us to enable us to conceal our thoughts. ~ Anne of the Island by Lucy Maud Montgomery

“I make no manner of doubt that you threw a very diamond of truth at me, though you see it hit me so directly in the face that it wasn’t exactly appreciated, at first.” ~ Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

Never tell all you know—not even to the person you know best. ~ The Secret Adversary by Agatha Christie

Fine, large, meaningless, general terms like romance and business can always be related. They take the place of thinking, and are highly useful to optimists and lecturers. ~ The Job by Sinclair Lewis

The fool wonders, the wise man asks. ~ Count Alarcos: A Tragedy by Benjamin Disraeli

A slight throbbing about the temples told me that this discussion had reached saturation point. ~ Right Ho, Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse

Mrs. Bittacy rustled ominously, holding her peace meanwhile. She feared long words she did not understand. Beelzebub lay hid among too many syllables. ~ The Man Whom the Trees Loved by Algernon Blackwood

To read between the lines was easier than to follow the text. ~ The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James

More Quotes about Communication

5 Imagination Quotes from Literature

January 14, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Quote Topics 

Imagination QuotesIt was better to know the worst than to wonder. ~ Gone With The Wind by Margaret Mitchell

“You gave too much rein to your imagination. Imagination is a good servant, and a bad master. The simplest explanation is always the most likely.” ~ The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie

My imagination requires a judicious rein; I am afraid to let it loose, for it carries me sometimes into appalling places beyond the stars and beneath the world. ~ The Listener by Algernon Blackwood

It will be found, in fact, that the ingenious are always fanciful, and the truly imaginative never otherwise than analytic. ~ The Murders in the Rue Morgue by Edgar Allan Poe

“I call people rich when they’re able to meet the requirements of their imagination.” ~ The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James

See More Imagination Quotes from Literature

8/2/14 – Select BBC Collections on Sale Including Miss Marple

August 2, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

Calling all fans of Agatha Christie’s Miss Marple!  Check out today’s Gold Box deal on BBC’s DVD collections.  Not a mystery fan?  Then you might be interested All Creatures Great & Small based on the book by James Herriot.

There are nonliterary titles included in the sale too.  I’m eyeing the Red Dwarf  collection and Fawlty Towers is always fun to watch.

Miss Marple

Hercule Poirot Quote Photo

September 2, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Quote Photos 

“Instinct is a marvellous thing,” mused Poirot. “It can neither be explained nor ignored.” ~ The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie

I hope you enjoy this quote photo. Wondering about the spelling of the word marvellous?  It’s the British spelling.

By the way, I’ve also posted this on the LitQuotes Facebook page as well as the LitQuotes Google Plus page for easier sharing.

Agayha Christie quote

New Quotes Added – Conan Doyle, Harriet Beecher Stowe and More

February 10, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Site News 

New QuotesToday I added over 40 new quotes to the database.  Here are my favorite quotes from the new batch. If you have a quote that you’d like to see added, feel free to contribute a quote.

To Sherlock Holmes she is always the woman. I have seldom heard him mention her under any other name. ~ A Scandal in Bohemia by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

“This looks like one of those unwelcome social summonses which call upon a man either to be bored or to lie.” ~ The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

“Instinct is a marvellous thing,” mused Poirot. “It can neither be explained nor ignored.” ~ The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie

The longest way must have its close,—the gloomiest night will wear on to a morning. ~ Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

Anne was always glad in the happiness of her friends; but it is sometimes a little lonely to be surrounded everywhere by a happiness that is not your own. ~ Anne of the Island by Lucy Maud Montgomery

 

Agatha Christie and the Westmacott Novels

September 15, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Author Information 

Agatha Christie was born on September 15, 1890 and passed away on January 12, 1976.  She’s popular today for her mystery novels featuring detectives like Hercule Poirot and Miss Jane Marple.  What you may not know is that she wrote six novels using the pen name of Mary Westmacott.

The Westmacott novels are typically classified as romance novels.  Are they really romance novels though?  Judge for yourself as you read the descriptions below.

Absent in the Spring: Stranded between trains, Joan Scudamore finds herself reflecting upon her life, her family, and finally coming to grips with the uncomfortable truths about her life.

Giant’s Bread: The story of Vernon Deyre, a composer and pianist whose obsession with art wreaks havoc with the two very different women in his life.

The Rose and the Yew Tree: In one of the finest explorations of the human heart, the compelling story of a deep and abiding love, the conflicts it encompasses, and the price that must be paid.

A Daughter’s Daughter: A daughter’s opposition to her mother’s plan to remarry threatens to destroy their relationship

Unfinished Portrait: Bereft of three people she has held most dear, Cecilla must decide if she has the strength to come to terms with the past.

The Burden: The burden of one sister’s love for her younger sister–whom she’s sworn to protect–has a dramatic effect on both their lives.

Learn More

Mary Westmacott Novels at Amazon

Literary Greats Paper Dolls

December 26, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

Oh, how I wish I’d seen this before Christmas!   I would have added the Literary Greats Paper Dolls Collection to my wish list.  This paper doll set for grownups contains 35 caricatures of famous authors, including Shakespeare, Mary Shelley, Edgar Allan Poe, Ayn Rand, and Charles Dickens. Each doll has three costumes that relate to the author’s work.  Fox example,  the Conan Doyle doll has a Sherlock Holmes costume and Agatha Christie can be decked out as Miss Marple.  Fun stuff!!

 






 

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