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10 Quotes about Fate from Literature

May 24, 2017 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Quote Topics 

Quotes About Fate

It is never quite safe to think we have done with life. When we imagine we have finished our story fate has a trick of turning the page and showing us yet another chapter. ~ Rainbow Valley by Lucy Maud Montgomery

It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate:
I am the captain of my soul.
 ~ Invictus by William Ernest Henley

You pay for what you get, you own what you pay for… and sooner or later whatever you own comes back home to you. ~ It by Stephen King

We are merely the stars’ tennis-balls, struck and banded Which way please them. ~ The Duchess of Malfi by John Webster

Were we no better than chessmen, moved by an unseen power, vessels the potter fashions at his fancy, for honour or for shame? ~ Lord Arthur Savile’s Crime by Oscar Wilde

There’s a divinity that shapes our ends,
Rough-hew them how we will.
 ~ Hamlet, Prince of Denmark by William Shakespeare

Fortune’s a right whore: If she give aught, she deals it in small parcels, That she may take away all at one swoop. ~ The White Devil by John Webster

But often the great cat Fate lets us go only to clutch us again in a fiercer grip. ~ The Curse of Eve by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

It is curious to look back and realize upon what trivial and apparently coincidental circumstances great events frequently turn as easily and naturally as a door on its hinges. ~ Allan Quatermain by H. Rider Haggard

“This whole act’s immutably decreed. ‘Twas rehearsed by thee and me a billion years before this ocean rolled. Fool! I am the Fates’ lieutenant; I act under orders.” ~ Moby Dick by Herman Melville

More Quotes About Fate

H. Rider Haggard 1856 – 1925

April 29, 2017 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Author Information 

H. Rider Haggard Quotes

 

Sir Henry Rider Haggard, better known as H. Rider Haggard, was an English writer of adventure novels.  He was born in 1856 and died in 1925.

He was born at Bradenham, Norfolk.  In his youth Haggard traveled to South Africa to work in the British government.  Later he would draw upon his experiences and knowledge of Africa as a writer.  He married Marianna Louisa Margitson in 1880.  The couple had a son named Jack (who died of measles at age 10) and three daughters, Angela, Dorothy and Lilias.

King Solomon’s Mines, one of his most famous books, was published in 1885 and introduced the character of Allan Quatermain.

Out of the dark we came, into the dark we go. Like a storm-driven bird at night we fly out of the Nowhere; for a moment our wings are seen in the light of the fire, and, lo! we are gone again into the Nowhere. ~ King Solomon’s Mines by H. Rider Haggard

H. Rider Haggard at Amazon.com

The Novels of H. Rider Haggard

Dawn
The Witch’s Head
King Solomon’s Mines
She
Allan Quatermain
Jess
A Tale of Three Lions
Maiwa’s Revenge, or the War of the Little Hand
Colonel Quaritch, VC
Cleopatra
Beatrice
The World’s Desire
Eric Brighteyes
Nada the Lily
An Heroic Effort
Montezuma’s Daughter
The People of the Mist
Heart of the World
Joan Haste
The Wizard
Doctor Therne
Swallow: A Tale of the Great Trek
Lysbeth
Pearl Maiden
Stella Fregelius: A Tale of Three Destinies
The Brethren
Ayesha: The Return of She
The Way of the Spirit
Benita
Fair Margaret
The Ghost Kings
The Yellow God
The Lady of Blossholme
Morning Star
Queen Sheba’s Ring
Red Eve
The Mahatma and the Hare
Marie
Child of Storm
The Wanderer’s Necklace
The Holy Flower
The Ivory Child
Finished
Love Eternal
Moon of Israel
When the World Shook
The Ancient Allan
She and Allan
The Virgin of the Sun
Wisdom’s Daughter
Heu-Heu
Queen of the Dawn
The Treasure of the Lake
Allan and the Ice-gods
Mary of Marion Isle
Belshazzar

 

Quotes from Literature about the Sky

September 12, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

Sky Quotes from Literatue

The western sky was clear and flushed with vivid crimson, towards which the prairie rolled away in varying tones of blue. ~ Blake’s Burden by Harold Bindloss

The whole earth was brimming sunshine that morning. She tripped along, the clear sky pouring liquid blue into her soul. ~ Sister Carrie by Theodore Dreiser

Who has not in his great grief felt a longing to look upon the outward features of the universal Mother; to lie on the mountains and watch the clouds drive across the sky and hear the rollers break in thunder on the shore, to let his poor struggling life mingle for a while in her life; to feel the slow beat of her eternal heart, and to forget his woes. ~ Allan Quatermain by H. Rider Haggard

The sky was clear — remarkably clear — and the twinkling of all the stars seemed to be but throbs of one body, timed by a common pulse. ~ Far From The Madding Crowd by Thomas Hardy

It’s lovely to live on a raft. We had the sky up there, all speckled with stars, and we used to lay on our backs and look up at them, and discuss about whether they was made or only just happened. ~ The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

 

Five Quotes About Adventure from Literature

March 16, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

“We are plain quiet folk and have no use for adventures. Nasty disturbing uncomfortable things! Make you late for dinner!” ~ The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien

“Adventurer” — he that goes out to meet whatever may come. Well, that is what we all do in the world one way or another. ~ Allan Quatermain by H. Rider Haggard

His love of danger, his intense appreciation of the drama of an adventure–all the more intense for being held tightly in–his consistent view that every peril in life is a form of sport, a fierce game betwixt you and Fate, with Death as a forfeit, made him a wonderful companion at such hours. ~ The Lost World by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

It is in vain to say human beings ought to be satisfied with tranquillity: they must have action; and they will make it if they cannot find it. ~ Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

By this, he seemed to mean, not only that the most reliable and useful courage was that which arises from the fair estimation of the encountered peril, but that an utterly fearless man is a far more dangerous comrade than a coward. ~ Moby Dick by Herman Melville

See More Adventure Quotes from Literature

Adventure Quotes from Literature






 

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