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15 Inspirational Quotes from Literature

November 9, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

Inspirational Quotes

It matters not how strait the gate,
How charged with punishments the scroll,
I am the master of my fate:
I am the captain of my soul.
 ~ Invictus by William Ernest Henley

“The world is a wheel, and it will all come round right.” ~ Endymion by Benjamin Disraeli

“Look at that sea, girls–all silver and shadow and vision of things not seen. We couldn’t enjoy its loveliness any more if we had millions of dollars and ropes of diamonds.” ~ Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery

“Simple, generous goodness is the best capital to found the business of this life upon. It lasts when fame and money fail, and is the only riches we can take out of this world with us.” ~ Little Men by Louisa May Alcott

From the death of each day’s hope another hope sprung up to live to-morrow. ~ The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens Quote photo

 

The mind is its own place, and in it self
Can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven.
 ~ Paradise Lost by John Milton

The dew seemed to sparkle more brightly on the green leaves; the air to rustle among them with a sweeter music; and the sky itself to look more blue and bright. Such is the influence which the condition of our own thoughts, exercise, even over the appearance of external objects. ~ Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

“Nurture your mind with great thoughts. To believe in the heroic makes heroes.” ~ Coningsby by Benjamin Disraeli

“I say that the strongest principle of growth lies in human choice.” ~ Daniel Deronda by George Eliot

“All things are ready, if our minds be so.” ~ Henry V by William Shakespeare

all things are ready quote


There are dark shadows on the earth, but its lights are stronger in the contrast.
 ~ The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens

The bird that would soar above the level plain of tradition and prejudice must have strong wings. ~ The Awakening by Kate Chopin

“Love has no age, no limit; and no death.” ~ The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy

“You know, there are two good things in life, freedom of thought and freedom of action.” ~ Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham

Come what may, I am bound to think that all things are ordered for the best; though when the good is a furlong off, and we with our beetle eyes can only see three inches, it takes some confidence in general principles to pull us through. ~ The Stark Munro Letters by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

BeetleEyes

See More Inspirational Quotes from Literature

 

Benjamin Disraeli 1804 – 1881

November 1, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Author Information 

Benjamin Disraeli
Benjamin Disraeli was born on December 21, 1804  and died on April 19, 1881.  He was a talented writer as well as a politician.  He twice served as Prime Minister. His works include Sybil, Coningsby and Vivian Grey.

  • While Disraeli was British, all of his grandparents and great grandparents were born in Italy
  • He was of Jewish birth, but later converted to Christianity.  As of this writing, he’s the only person to hold the office of British Prime Minister who was born Jewish.
  • In 1839 Disraeli married Mary Anne Lewis.  She was twelve years older than Disraeli and had an income of £5,000 a year. “Dizzy married me for my money,” his wife later said, “But, if he had the chance again, he would marry me for love.”
  • He served as Prime Minister twice.  The first time was from February 27 to 1 December of 1868.  The second time Disraeli was Prime Minister was from February 20, 1874 to April 21, 1880.
  • Disraeli is remembered for his political battles with the Liberal leader, William Ewart Gladstone.
  • Hughenden Manor, a red brick Victorian mansion, located in High Wycombe, Buckinghamshire, England was Disraeli’s country house.  In 1862 the Disraelis had the house remodelled by the architect Edward Buckton Lamb. Today, it is owned by the National Trust and open to the public.
  • Disraeli had a close friendship with Queen Victoria, who in 1876 created him Earl of Beaconsfield.

“There is no act of treachery or meanness of which a political party is not capable; for in politics there is no honour.” ~ Vivian Grey by Benjamin Disraeli

“We are all born for love,” said Morley. “It is the principle of existence, and its only end.” ~ Sybil by Benjamin Disraeli

“Nurture your mind with great thoughts. To believe in the heroic makes heroes.” ~ Coningsby by Benjamin Disraeli

Novels by Benjamin Disraeli

  • Vivian Grey
  • Popanilla
  • The Young Duke
  • Contarini Fleming
  • Ixion in Heaven
  • The Wondrous Tale of Alroy
  • The Rise of Iskander
  • The Infernal Marriage
  • Henrietta Temple
  • Venetia
  • Coningsby, or the New Generation
  • Sybil, or The Two Nations
  • Tancred, or the New Crusade
  • Lothair
  • Endymion
  • Falconet (unfinished)

More About Benjamin Disraeli

11 Quotes From Literature about Aging

October 17, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

Quotes about Aging“At forty you stand upon the threshold of life, with values learned and rubbish cleared away. “ ~ A Prisoner in Fairyland by Algernon Blackwood

“Anybody is liable to rheumatism in her legs, Anne. It’s only old people who should have rheumatism in their souls, though. Thank goodness, I never have. When you get rheumatism in your soul you might as well go and pick out your coffin.” ~ Anne of the Island by Lucy Maud Montgomery

At last, however, his conversation became unbearable–a foul young man is odious, but a foul old one is surely the most sickening thing on earth. One feels that the white upon the hair, like that upon the mountain, should signify a height attained. ~ The Stark Munro Letters by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

When one grew old, the whole world was in conspiracy to limit freedom, and for what reason?–just to keep the breath in him a little longer. He did not want it at such cost. ~ The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy

Indeed, he would sometimes remark, when a man fell into his anecdotage, it was a sign for him to retire from the world. ~ Lothair by Benjamin Disraeli

“No one is ever too old to do a foolish thing.” ~ Uncle Silas by J. Sheridan Le Fanu

“As I said just now, the world has gone past me. I don’t blame it; but I no longer understand it. Tradesmen are not the same as they used to be, apprentices are not the same, business is not the same, business commodities are not the same. Seven-eighths of my stock is old-fashioned. I am an old-fashioned man in an old-fashioned shop, in a street that is not the same as I remember it. I have fallen behind the time, and am too old to catch it again.” ~ Dombey and Son by Charles Dickens

“The young have aspirations that never come to pass, the old have reminiscences of what never happened. It’s only the middle-aged who are really conscious of their limitations–that is why one should be so patient with them.” ~ Reginald by Saki

Don’t ever think the poetry is dead in an old man because his forehead is wrinkled, or that his manhood has left him when his hand trembles! If they ever WERE there, they ARE there still! ~ The Autocrat of the Breakfast Table by Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr.

There comes with old age a time when the heart is no longer fusible or malleable, and must retain the form in which it has cooled down. ~ Uncle Silas by J. Sheridan Le Fanu

What is the meaning of life? That was all–a simple question; one that tended to close in on one with years. The great revelation had never come. The great revelation perhaps never did come. Instead there were little daily miracles, illuminations, matches struck unexpectedly in the dark. ~ To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

More Quotes About Aging from Literature 

40 Great Quotes from Literature

August 14, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

40 Great Quotes from LiteratureNeed some advice or perspective?  Here are 40 great quotes from literature that may help.  These are some of our favorites from our words of wisdom quote collection.

  1. The mind has many watchdogs; sometimes they bark unnecessarily, but a wise man never ignores their warning. ~ A Fall of Moondust by Arthur C. Clarke
  2. Words spoken cannot be recalled. ~ He Knew He Was Right by Anthony Trollope
  3. People often claim to hunger for truth, but seldom like the taste when it’s served up. ~ A Clash of Kings by George R. R. Martin
  4. Fair speech may hide a foul heart. ~ The Two Towers by J. R. R. Tolkien
  5. It is always the unusual which alarms. ~ The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy
  6. It is not violence that best overcomes hate-nor vengeance that most certainly heals injury. ~ Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  7. Courage is fire, and bullying is smoke. ~ Count Alarcos: A Tragedy by Benjamin Disraeli
  8. There is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so. ~ Hamlet, Prince of Denmark by William Shakespeare
  9. “Words,” said the host, at length, “is worse’n bullets. You never know what they’ll hit.” ~ The Night Horseman by Max Brand
  10. Never forget what you are, for surely the world will not. Make it your strength. Then it can never be your weakness. Armor yourself in it, and it will never be used to hurt you. ~ A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin
  11. “When you’ve learned to laugh at the things that should be laughed at, and not to laugh at those that shouldn’t, you’ve got wisdom and understanding.” ~ Anne of the Island by Lucy Maud Montgomery
  12. The fool wonders, the wise man asks. ~ Count Alarcos: A Tragedy by Benjamin Disraeli
  13. “All things are ready, if our minds be so.” ~ Henry V by William Shakespeare
    all things are ready quote
  14. “No one is ever too old to do a foolish thing.” ~ Uncle Silas by J. Sheridan Le Fanu
  15. “Would the world ever have been made if its maker had been afraid of making trouble? Making life means making trouble.” ~ Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw
  16. Cheerfulness, it would appear, is a matter which depends fully as much on the state of things within as on the state of things without and around us. ~ Shirley by Charlotte Bronte
  17. “Just breathing isn’t living!” ~ Pollyanna by Eleanor H. Porter
  18. “Self-love, my liege, is not so vile a sin, As self-neglecting.” ~ Henry V by William Shakespeare
  19. The mind is its own place, and in it self
    Can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven.
     ~ Paradise Lost by John Milton
  20. To be conscious that you are ignorant is a great step to knowledge. ~ Sybil by Benjamin Disraeli
  21. “Next to trying and winning, the best thing is trying and failing.” ~ Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud MontgomeryTrying and Willing Quote
  22. “Nobody can spoil a life, my dear. That’s nonsense. Things happen, but we bob up.” ~ The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy
  23. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery. ~ David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
  24. “Do you know anything on earth which has not a dangerous side if it is mishandled and exaggerated? “ ~ The Land of Mist by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  25. The bird that would soar above the level plain of tradition and prejudice must have strong wings. ~ The Awakening by Kate ChopinKate Chopin quote
  26. You cannot make a man by standing a sheep on its hind-legs. But by standing a flock of sheep in that position you can make a crowd of men. ~ Zuleika Dobson by Sir Max Beerbohm
  27. Unwelcome truths are not popular. ~ The Valley of Fear by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  28. “And, above all things, never think that you’re not good enough yourself. A man should never think that. My belief is that in life people will take you very much at your own reckoning.” ~ The Small House at Allington by Anthony Trollope
  29. How quick come the reasons for approving what we like! ~ Persuasion by Jane Austen
  30. Gossip is a sort of smoke that comes from the dirty tobacco-pipes of of those who diffuse it: it proves nothing but the bad taste of the smoker. ~ Daniel Deronda by George Eliot
  31. “The chief proof of man’s real greatness lies in his perception of his own smallness.” ~ The Sign of the Four by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  32. She could not explain in so many words, but she felt that those who prepare for all the emergencies of life beforehand may equip themselves at the expense of joy. ~ Howards End by E. M. ForsterExpense of Joy Quote
  33. He has spent his life best who has enjoyed it most. ~ The Way of All Flesh by Samuel Butler
  34. Ignorance is the parent of fear. ~ Moby Dick by Herman Melville
  35. “Its matter was not new to me, but was presented in a new aspect. It shook me in my habit – the habit of nine-tenths of the world – of believing that all was right about me, because I was used to it.” ~ Dombey and Son by Charles Dickens
  36. A man will tell you that he has worked in a mine for forty years unhurt by an accident as a reason why he should apprehend no danger, though the roof is beginning to sink. ~ Silas Marner by George Eliot
  37. The world is a looking-glass, and gives back to every man the reflection of his own face. Frown at it, and it will in turn look sourly upon you; laugh at it and with it, and it is a jolly kind companion; and so let all young persons take their choice. ~ Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
  38. Old habit of mind is one of the toughest things to get away from in the world. It transmits itself like physical form and feature. ~ A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain
  39. “We learn from failure, not from success!” ~ Dracula by Bram Stoker
  40. Conventionality is not morality. Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last. ~ Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
    Jane Eyre Quote

12 Quotes of Hope and Inspiration on the 12th Anniversary of 9/11

September 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

Candle

In the Destroyer’s steps there spring up bright creations that defy his power, and his dark path becomes a way of light to Heaven. ~ The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens

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“In this world you’ve just got to hope for the best and prepare for the worst and take whatever God sends.” ~ Anne Of Avonlea by Lucy Maud Montgomery

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There are dark shadows on the earth, but its lights are stronger in the contrast. ~ The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens

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“Simple, generous goodness is the best capital to found the business of this life upon. It lasts when fame and money fail, and is the only riches we can take out of this world with us.” ~ Little Men by Louisa May Alcott

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“The world is a wheel, and it will all come round right.” ~ Endymion by Benjamin Disraeli

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“To endure is greater than to dare; to tire out hostile fortune; to be daunted by no difficulty; to keep heart when all have lost it; to go through intrigue spotless; and to forgo even ambition when the end is gained–who can say this is not greatness.” ~ The Virginians by William Makepeace Thackeray

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Men who look on nature, and their fellow-men, and cry that all is dark and gloomy, are in the right; but the sombre colours are reflections from their own jaundiced eyes and hearts. The real hues are delicate, and need a clearer vision. ~ Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

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Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlying our hard hearts. ~ Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

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“Love has no age, no limit; and no death.” ~ The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy

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Even on this small stage we have our two sides, and something might be done by throwing all one’s weight on the scale of breadth, tolerance, charity, temperance, peace, and kindliness to man and beast. We can’t all strike very big blows, and even the little ones count for something. ~ The Stark Munro Letters by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

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I believe that this life is not all; neither the beginning nor the end. I believe while I tremble; I trust while I weep. ~ Villette by Charlotte Bronte

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“I have read in your face, as plain as if it was a book, that but for some trouble and sorrow we should never know half the good there is about us.” ~ The Haunted Man by Charles Dickens

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Inspirational Quotes from Literature

Hope Quotes from Literature

Can We Chat?

January 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

Communication QuotesThe other day I noticed that the site has a lot of great quotes that deal with communication.  Here are a few of my favorites.

“Facts or opinions which are to pass through the hands of so many, to be misconceived by folly in one, and ignorance in another, can hardly have much truth left.” ~  Persuasion by Jane Austen

The fool wonders, the wise man asks. ~ Count Alarcos: A Tragedy by Benjamin Disraeli

Mrs. Bittacy rustled ominously, holding her peace meanwhile. She feared long words she did not understand. Beelzebub lay hid among too many syllables. ~ The Man Whom the Trees Loved by Algernon Blackwood

Silence is of different kinds, and breathes different meanings. ~ Villette by Charlotte Bronte

10 Funny Quotes from Literature

November 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens, Everything Else 

LitQuotesClassic literature can be inspirational.  It can be poetic.  It can be educational.  Classic literature can also be really funny!  Check out these ten funny quotes from literature:

1 – “How dreadful!” cried Lord Henry. “I can stand brute force, but brute reason is quite unbearable. There is something unfair about its use. It is hitting below the intellect.” ~  The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

2 – “If you could see my legs when I take my boots off, you’d form some idea of what unrequited affection is.”  ~  Dombey and Son by Charles Dickens

3 – Indeed, he would sometimes remark, when a man fell into his anecdotage, it was a sign for him to retire from the world. ~  Lothair by Benjamin Disraeli

4 – You cannot make a man by standing a sheep on its hind-legs. But by standing a flock of sheep in that position you can make a crowd of men. ~  Zuleika Dobson by Sir Max Beerbohm

5 – The bishop did not whistle: we believe that they lose the power of doing so on being consecrated. ~  The Warden by Anthony Trollope

6 – A story with a moral appended is like the bill of a mosquito. It bores you, and then injects a stinging drop to irritate your conscience. ~  Strictly Business by O. Henry

7  – From politics, it was an easy step to silence. ~  Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen

8 – Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example. ~  The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson by Mark Twain

9 – It is not that I object to the work, mind you; I like work: it fascinates me. I can sit and look at it for hours. ~  Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome

10 – I don’t want to repeat my innocence. I want the pleasure of losing it again. ~  This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald

If you enjoyed these quotes check out our humorous quotes page or our random funny quote feature.

Dodger by Terry Pratchett

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens 

DodgerTerry Pratchett, author of the Discworld novels,  leaves fantasy for a moment to write about Victorian England with Dodger.

As you might guess, the main character of the novel is  based on the Artful Dodger from Oliver Twist.   Dodger is  a young adult who lives by his wits in London.  The story starts out on, pardon the cliché, a dark and stormy night …

A storm. Rain-lashed city streets. A flash of lightning. A scruffy lad sees a girl leap desperately from a horse-drawn carriage in a vain attempt to escape her captors. Can the lad stand by and let her be caught again? Of course not, because he’s . . . Dodger.

Seventeen-year-old Dodger may be a street urchin, but he gleans a living from London’s sewers, and he knows a jewel when he sees one. He’s not about to let anything happen to the unknown girl—not even if her fate impacts some of the most powerful people in England.

From Dodger’s encounter with the mad barber Sweeney Todd to his meetings with the great writer Charles Dickens and the calculating politician Benjamin Disraeli, history and fantasy intertwine in a breathtaking account of adventure and mystery.

Beloved and bestselling author Sir Terry Pratchett combines high comedy with deep wisdom in this tale of an unexpected coming-of-age and one remarkable boy’s rise in a complex and fascinating world.

Dodger by Terry Pratchett

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