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Six Quotes about Danger from Literature

January 6, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Quote Topics 

Danger QuotesFear of danger is ten thousand times more terrifying than danger itself. ~ Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

“You have plenty of courage, I am sure,” answered Oz. “All you need is confidence in yourself. There is no living thing that is not afraid when it faces danger. The true courage is in facing danger when you are afraid, and that kind of courage you have in plenty.” ~ The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum

“Do you know anything on earth which has not a dangerous side if it is mishandled and exaggerated? “ ~ The Land of Mist by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

It is in the uncompromisingness with which dogma is held and not in the dogma or want of dogma that the danger lies. ~ The Way of All Flesh by Samuel Butler

By this, he seemed to mean, not only that the most reliable and useful courage was that which arises from the fair estimation of the encountered peril, but that an utterly fearless man is a far more dangerous comrade than a coward. ~ Moby Dick by Herman Melville

A man will tell you that he has worked in a mine for forty years unhurt by an accident as a reason why he should apprehend no danger, though the roof is beginning to sink. ~ Silas Marner by George Eliot

More Danger Quotes from Literature

Five Facts About Daniel Defoe (1660 – 1731)

September 29, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Author Information 

Daniel Defoe QuotesDaniel Defoe (1660 – April 24, 1731) was an English writer most famous for his novels Robinson Crusoe and Moll Flanders. Here are five facts about him that you may not know:

1 – His name at birth was Daniel Foe. He later changed his name to the more aristocratic-sounding Defoe.

2 – He lived through both the Great Plague of London (1665) and the Great Fire of London (1666).

3 – For a time he worked as a general merchant. Some of the goods he dealt with were hosiery, general woolen goods, and wine.  His business was not successful and he went bankrupt in 1692.

4 – In 1684 he married Mary Tuffley. They had eight children.

5 –  Defoe’s first literary endeavors were writing political pamphlets and as a journalist.  In 1701 he wrote The True-Born Englishman.  The satirical poem defended King William III, who was Dutch, against William’s enemies who pushed for “English racial purity”.

Fear of danger is ten thousand times more terrifying than danger itself. ~ Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe

Novels by Daniel Defoe

  • Robinson Crusoe
  • The Farther Adventures of Robinson Crusoe
  • Serious reflections during the life and surprising adventures of Robinson Crusoe: with his Vision of the angelick world
  • Memoirs of a Cavalier
  • Captain Singleton
  • A Journal of the Plague Year
  • Colonel Jack
  • Moll Flanders
  • Roxana: The Fortunate Mistress






 

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