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Five Scary Quotes from the Work of Charles Dickens

October 4, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens 

Five Scary Quotes from the Work of Charles DickensCharles Dickens (1812 to 1870) is possibly best known for A Christmas Carol.  However that’s not his only work that features ghostly phrasings.  Here are five quotes from other works to give you a pre-Halloween thrill.

“I will die here where I have walked. And I will walk here, though I am in my grave. I will walk here until the pride of this house is humbled.” ~ Bleak House by Charles Dickens

I saw that the bride within the bridal dress had withered like the dress, and like the flowers, and had no brightness left but the brightness of her sunken eyes. ~ Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

“I have heard it said that as we keep our birthdays when we are alive, so the ghosts of dead people, who are not easy in their graves, keep the day they died upon.” ~ Barnaby Rudge by Charles Dickens

Around and around the house the leaves fall thick, but never fast, for they come circling down with a dead lightness that is sombre and slow. ~ Bleak House by Charles Dickens

There was a frosty rime upon the trees, which, in the faint light of the clouded moon, hung upon the smaller branches like dead garlands. ~ The Battle of Life by Charles Dickens

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Great Expectations Movie Comes to the United States

September 20, 2013 by · 1 Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens, LitQuotes in Movies 

Last year Great Expectations staring  Helena Bonham Carter, Ralph Fiennes, Sally Hawkins and Jason Flemyng debuted in the UK.  The US version of the movie is coming to theaters on November 8th.  That seems like ages to me!  I can’t wait to see this film.  In the meantime here’s the trailer:

12 Quotes of Hope and Inspiration on the 12th Anniversary of 9/11

September 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

Candle

In the Destroyer’s steps there spring up bright creations that defy his power, and his dark path becomes a way of light to Heaven. ~ The Old Curiosity Shop by Charles Dickens

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“In this world you’ve just got to hope for the best and prepare for the worst and take whatever God sends.” ~ Anne Of Avonlea by Lucy Maud Montgomery

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There are dark shadows on the earth, but its lights are stronger in the contrast. ~ The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens

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“Simple, generous goodness is the best capital to found the business of this life upon. It lasts when fame and money fail, and is the only riches we can take out of this world with us.” ~ Little Men by Louisa May Alcott

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“The world is a wheel, and it will all come round right.” ~ Endymion by Benjamin Disraeli

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“To endure is greater than to dare; to tire out hostile fortune; to be daunted by no difficulty; to keep heart when all have lost it; to go through intrigue spotless; and to forgo even ambition when the end is gained–who can say this is not greatness.” ~ The Virginians by William Makepeace Thackeray

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Men who look on nature, and their fellow-men, and cry that all is dark and gloomy, are in the right; but the sombre colours are reflections from their own jaundiced eyes and hearts. The real hues are delicate, and need a clearer vision. ~ Oliver Twist by Charles Dickens

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Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlying our hard hearts. ~ Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

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“Love has no age, no limit; and no death.” ~ The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy

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Even on this small stage we have our two sides, and something might be done by throwing all one’s weight on the scale of breadth, tolerance, charity, temperance, peace, and kindliness to man and beast. We can’t all strike very big blows, and even the little ones count for something. ~ The Stark Munro Letters by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

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I believe that this life is not all; neither the beginning nor the end. I believe while I tremble; I trust while I weep. ~ Villette by Charlotte Bronte

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“I have read in your face, as plain as if it was a book, that but for some trouble and sorrow we should never know half the good there is about us.” ~ The Haunted Man by Charles Dickens

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Four Quotes About Reality From Literature

July 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

illusionIs this the real me?  Is that the real you?  Who knows?  Maybe these four quotes from literature about reality will help us sort it out.

Affery, like greater people, had always been right in her facts, and always wrong in the theories she deduced from them. ~ Little Dorrit by Charles Dickens

Words, as is well known, are the great foes of reality. ~ Under Western Eyes by Joseph Conrad

Sometimes people carry to such perfection the mask they have assumed that in due course they actually become the person they seem. ~ The Moon and Sixpence by W. Somerset Maugham

All other swindlers upon earth are nothing to the self-swindlers, and with such pretences did I cheat myself. Surely a curious thing. That I should innocently take a bad half-crown of somebody else’s manufacture, is reasonable enough; but that I should knowingly reckon the spurious coin of my own make, as good money!  ~ Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

Reality Quotes from Literature Colletion

Ten Noteworthy Quotes – Words of Wisdom From Books

April 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

20130419booksMorning made a considerable difference in my general prospect of Life, and brightened it so much that it scarcely seemed the same. ~  Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

“Self-love, my liege, is not so vile a sin, As self-neglecting.” ~  Henry V by William Shakespeare

“Would the world ever have been made if its maker had been afraid of making trouble? Making life means making trouble.” ~ Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw

The mind is its own place, and in it self
Can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven.
 ~ Paradise Lost by John Milton

“Next to trying and winning, the best thing is trying and failing.” ~ Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery

The world is a looking-glass, and gives back to every man the reflection of his own face. Frown at it, and it will in turn look sourly upon you; laugh at it and with it, and it is a jolly kind companion; and so let all young persons take their choice. ~ Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray

Conventionality is not morality. Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last. ~ Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

“We learn from failure, not from success!” ~  Dracula by Bram Stoker

It is a fair, even-handed, noble adjustment of things, that while there is infection in disease and sorrow, there is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good-humour. ~  A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

“This above all,–to thine own self be true; and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.” ~  Hamlet, Prince of Denmark by William Shakespeare

View All Words of Wisdom Quotes

 

10 Dickens Quotes on his 201st Birthday

February 7, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens 

Charles DickensToday marks the 201st anniversary of the birth of Charles Dickens.  To mark the event I thought I’d share 10 of my favorite Dickens quotes:

  1. Heaven knows we need never be ashamed of our tears, for they are rain upon the blinding dust of earth, overlying our hard hearts. ~  Great Expectations

  2. At last, in the dead of the night, when the street was very still indeed, Little Dorrit laid the heavy head upon her bosom, and soothed her to sleep. And thus she sat at the gate, as it were alone; looking up at the stars, and seeing the clouds pass over them in their wild flight–which was the dance at Little Dorrit’s party. ~  Little Dorrit

  3. “If you could see my legs when I take my boots off, you’d form some idea of what unrequited affection is.”  ~  Dombey and Son

  4. “It’s in vain, Trot, to recall the past, unless it works some influence upon the present.”  ~  David Copperfield

  5. All other swindlers upon earth are nothing to the self-swindlers, and with such pretences did I cheat myself. Surely a curious thing. That I should innocently take a bad half-crown of somebody else’s manufacture, is reasonable enough; but that I should knowingly reckon the spurious coin of my own make, as good money!  ~  Great Expectations

  6. “You may be an undigested bit of beef, a blot of mustard, a crumb of cheese, a fragment of underdone potato. There’s more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you are!” ~  A Christmas Carol

  7. It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of light, it was the season of darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to heaven, we were all going direct the other way–in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only. ~  A Tale of Two Cities

  8. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery. ~  David Copperfield

  9. “Its matter was not new to me, but was presented in a new aspect. It shook me in my habit – the habit of nine-tenths of the world – of believing that all was right about me, because I was used to it.” ~  Dombey and Son

  10. “No one is useless in this world,” retorted the Secretary, “who lightens the burden of it for any one else.” ~  Our Mutual Friend

You might also enjoy these Dickens resources:

First New Quotes of The Year Added

January 6, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens, Site News 

New QuotesToday I added new quotes to the database.  This brings the collection to 2,259, sourced quotes from literature.  Will 2013 be the year that the collection grows to 3,000 quotes?  Here’s hoping!  If you’d like to help make that happen, feel free to contribute a quote. In the meantime, here are my favorite quotes from the new batch.

Scattered wits take a long time picking up. ~ Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

Work consists of whatever a body is obliged to do, and that Play consists of whatever a body is not obliged to do. ~ The Adventures of Tom Sawyer by Mark Twain

That which is loved may pass, but love hath no end. ~ Parables Of A Province by Gilbert Parker

Wit is always at the elbow of want. ~ No Defense by Gilbert Parker

Great Expectations Trailer

October 28, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens, LitQuotes in Movies 

Here’s the trailer for the new Great Expectations movie. The UK release date is November 30th of 2012. I haven’t seen a firm release date for the US as of yet.

Five Classic Novels Combined With a Touch of Horror

October 2, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

In honor of Halloween I put together this list of five classic novels that have been rewritten with a different twist.  What happens when classic literature crosses with the horror genre?  You get titles like . . . .

Jane SlayerJane Slayre, our plucky demon-slaying heroine, is a courageous orphan who spurns the detestable vampyre kin who raised her, sets out on the advice of her ghostly uncle to hone her skills as the fearless slayer she’s meant to be. When she takes a job as a governess at a country estate, she falls head-over-heels for her new master, Mr. Rochester, only to discover he’s hiding a violent werewolf in the attic–in the form of his first wife. Vampyres, zombies, and werewolves transform Charlotte Bronte’s unforgettable masterpiece into an eerie paranormal adventure that will delight and terrify.

 

Zombies

“It is a truth universally acknowledged that a zombie in possession of brains must be in want of more brains.”

So begins Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, an expanded edition of the beloved Jane Austen novel featuring all-new scenes of bone-crunching zombie mayhem. As our story opens, a mysterious plague has fallen upon the quiet English village of Meryton—and the dead are returning to life! Feisty heroine Elizabeth Bennet is determined to wipe out the zombie menace, but she’s soon distracted by the arrival of the haughty and arrogant Mr. Darcy. What ensues is a delightful comedy of manners with plenty of civilized sparring between the two young lovers—and even more violent sparring on the blood-soaked battlefield.

 

Heathcliff: Vampire of Wuthering Heights starts with a mysterious letter.  Lockwood, a law clerk in London and amateur vampire stalker, must investigate, no matter the peril to himself. Traveling into the misty moors of Yorkshire, Lockwood finds the strange owner of Wuthering Heights, Heathcliff, and becomes trapped in the evil enveloping all of Yorkshire. Driven nearly to madness by his unrequited love for Catherine Earnshaw, Heathcliff roams the moors and is transformed into one of the undead, a vampire. But when he returns to claim his beloved, he finds that she too is forever changed and cannot become one of the undead.  Heathcliff begins a cycle of madness that might satisfy his blood lust, but never his heart’s desire. Now he reveals the history of carnage and revenge to his most unwilling listener and next victim…

 


 

Grave Expectations

Heaven knows, we need never be ashamed of our wolfish cravings. . . .

In Grave Expectations bristly, sensitive, and meat-hungry Pip is a robust young whelp, an orphan born under a full moon. Between hunting escaped convicts alongside zombified soldiers, trying not to become one of the hunted himself, and hiding his hairy hands from the supernaturally beautiful and haughty Estella, whose devilish moods keep him chomping at the bit, Pip is sure he will die penniless or a convict like the rest of his commonly uncommon kind.  But then a mysterious benefactor sends him to London for the finest werewolf education money can buy.

 

Sea MonstersSense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters expands the original text of the beloved Jane Austen novel with all-new scenes of giant lobsters, rampaging octopi, two-headed sea serpents, and other biological monstrosities. As our story opens, the Dashwood sisters are evicted from their childhood home and sent to live on a mysterious island full of savage creatures and dark secrets. While sensible Elinor falls in love with Edward Ferrars, her romantic sister Marianne is courted by both the handsome Willoughby and the hideous man-monster Colonel Brandon. Can the Dashwood sisters triumph over meddlesome matriarchs and unscrupulous rogues to find true love? Or will they fall prey to the tentacles that are forever snapping at their heels? This masterful portrait of Regency England blends Jane Austen’s biting social commentary with ultraviolent depictions of sea monsters biting. It’s survival of the fittest—and only the swiftest swimmers will find true love!

Happy 2012!!

January 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle 

LitQuotesHappy New Year!  May 2012 bring you health, laughter and love.  Here are some quotes from our daily quotes page for the new year . . .

The future was with Fate. The present was our own. ~ The Poison Belt by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

“Now, I return to this young fellow. And the communication I have got to make is, that he has great expectations.” ~ Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

“Ride on! Rough-shod if need be, smooth-shod if that will do, but ride on! Ride on over all obstacles, and win the race!” ~ David Copperfield by Charles Dickens

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