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Quotes About Communication

August 17, 2017 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Quote Topics 

Communication Quotes

The site has a large collection of literary quotes about communication.  These are some of my favorites.

In reality they all lived in a kind of hieroglyphic world, where the real thing was never said or done or even thought, but only represented by a set of arbitrary signs. ~ The Age of Innocence by Edith Wharton

“Old men only lie in wait for people to ask them to talk. Then they rattle on like a rusty elevator wheezing up a shaft.” ~ Dandelion Wine by Ray Bradbury

Often I must speak other than I think. That is called diplomacy. ~ Dune Messiah by Frank Herbert

“With no intention to take offence, I deny your right to put words into my mouth.” ~ Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

Our words are giants when they do us an injury, and dwarfs when they do us a service. ~ The Woman in White by Wilkie Collins

“Words,” said the host, at length, “is worse’n bullets. You never know what they’ll hit.” ~ The Night Horseman by Max Brand

Fair speech may hide a foul heart. ~ The Two Towers by J. R. R. Tolkien

We are never half so interesting when we have learned that language is given us to enable us to conceal our thoughts. ~ Anne of the Island by Lucy Maud Montgomery

“I make no manner of doubt that you threw a very diamond of truth at me, though you see it hit me so directly in the face that it wasn’t exactly appreciated, at first.” ~ Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

Never tell all you know—not even to the person you know best. ~ The Secret Adversary by Agatha Christie

Fine, large, meaningless, general terms like romance and business can always be related. They take the place of thinking, and are highly useful to optimists and lecturers. ~ The Job by Sinclair Lewis

The fool wonders, the wise man asks. ~ Count Alarcos: A Tragedy by Benjamin Disraeli

A slight throbbing about the temples told me that this discussion had reached saturation point. ~ Right Ho, Jeeves by P. G. Wodehouse

Mrs. Bittacy rustled ominously, holding her peace meanwhile. She feared long words she did not understand. Beelzebub lay hid among too many syllables. ~ The Man Whom the Trees Loved by Algernon Blackwood

To read between the lines was easier than to follow the text. ~ The Portrait of a Lady by Henry James

More Quotes about Communication

Quotes about Remorse

August 13, 2017 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Quote Topics 

Quotes about Remorse

But sorry is the Kool-Aid of human emotions. It’s what you say when you spill a cup of coffee or throw a gutterball when you’re bowling with the girls in the league. True sorrow is as rare as true love. ~ Carrie by Stephen King

Her husband had archaic ideas about jewels; a man bought them for his wife in acknowledgment of things he could not gracefully utter. ~ A Lost Lady by Willa Cather

“The study of Nature makes a man at last as remorseless as Nature.” ~ The Island of Doctor Moreau by H. G. Wells

“There is no refuge from memory and remorse in this world. The spirits of our foolish deeds haunt us, with or without repentance.” ~ Mrs. Falchion by Gilbert Parker

It is a good rule in life never to apologize. The right sort of people do not want apologies, and the wrong sort take a mean advantage of them. ~ The Man Upstairs by P. G. Wodehouse

More Literary Quotes About Remorse

 

Six Degrees of J. M. Barrie

October 11, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Author Information, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle 

J.M. Barrie Could James M. Barrie, the author of Peter Pan, be the literary Kevin Bacon of his day? It might sound a little nutty, but take a look at his connections:

  • He had a long-standing correspondence with Robert Louis Stevenson.  Despite that fact that the two wrote many letters, they never met in person.
  • George Meredith, the author of The Ordeal of Richard Feverel, was his friend.
  • George Bernard Shaw was Barrie’s neighbor for several years.
  • He collaborated with H.B. Marriott Watson on a biography of Richard Savage.
  • Barrie’s friend H. G. Wells tried to help him with his marital problems.
  • Barrie knew Thomas Hardy.
  • Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and James M. Barrie were good friends.  You can read about their friendship at our partner site, The Chronicles of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle.
  • Barrie’s formed a cricket team, the Allah-Akabarries. Some of Barrie’s teammates included, Conan Dolye, H. G. Wells, Jerome K. Jerome, P. G. WodehouseA. E. W. Mason, E. V. Lucas, E. W. Hornung, Maurice Hewlett, A. A. Milne (of Winnie the Pooh fame) and G. K. Chesterton.






 

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