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When I am King

September 4, 2017 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Quote Photos 

When I am king

“When I am king, they shall not have bread and shelter only, but also teachings out of books; for a full belly is little worth where the mind is starved.” ~ The Prince and The Pauper by Mark Twain

Photo by John-Mark Kuznietsov on Unsplash

10 Dream Quotes from Literature

May 30, 2017 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Quote Topics 

Quotes About Dreams

But dreams come through stone walls, light up dark rooms, or darken light ones, and their persons make their exits and their entrances as they please, and laugh at locksmiths. ~ Carmilla by J. Sheridan Le Fanu

He smiled the most exquisite smile, veiled by memory, tinged by dreams. ~ To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

“I talk of dreams,
Which are the children of an idle brain,
Begot of nothing but vain fantasy.”
 ~ Romeo and Juliet by William Shakespeare

She was suddenly tired of outworn dreams. ~ Rainbow Valley by Lucy Maud Montgomery

There is no more thrilling sensation I know of than sailing. It comes as near to flying as man has got to yet – except in dreams. ~ Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome

It was always the becoming he dreamed of, never the being. ~ This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald

“Well, many’s the long night I’ve dreamed of cheese–toasted, mostly.” ~ Treasure Island by Robert Louis Stevenson

At a single strain of music, the scent of a flower, or even one glimpse of a path of moonlight lying fair upon a Summer sea, the barriers crumble and fall. Through the long corridors the ghosts of the past walk unforbidden, hindered only by broken promises, dead hopes, and dream-dust. ~ Old Rose and Silver by Myrtle Reed

“We live, as we dream–alone.” ~ Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad

“And so I am become a knight of the Kingdom of Dreams and Shadows!” ~ The Prince and The Pauper by Mark Twain

More Quotes about Dreams

Five Facts About Mark Twain (1835 – 1910)

January 17, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Author Information 

Mark Twain1 – Mark Twain, whose real name was Samuel Langhorne Clemens, was born on November 30th 1835. He died on April 21st, 1910.

2 – For a time he worked as a riverboat pilot on the Mississippi River. He also worked as a newspaper journalist and a miner before he turned to writing fiction.

3 – While he was well paid as a writer, he was plagued with financial problems. One of his biggest problems was bad investments. He lost a lot of money with his investment in Paige Compositor, a mechanical typesetter. Twain eventually declared bankruptcy. However later he paid back all of his creditors.

4 – He married Olivia Landon in 1870. They remained together until her death in 1904. They had four children.

5 – Twain was born shortly after a visit by Halley’s Comet. He told people that he would “go out with it” as well. Here’s a quote from Twain in 1909.

I came in with Halley’s Comet in 1835. It is coming again next year, and I expect to go out with it. It will be the greatest disappointment of my life if I don’t go out with Halley’s Comet. The Almighty has said, no doubt: ‘Now here are these two unaccountable freaks; they came in together, they must go out together’.

Twain predicted correctly. He died the day after the comet’s return.

Novels by Mark Twain

The Gilded Age: A Tale of Today
The Adventures of Tom Sawyer
The Prince and the Pauper
Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court
The American Claimant
The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson
Tom Sawyer Abroad
Personal Recollections of Joan of Arc
Tom Sawyer, Detective
The Mysterious Stranger (published posthumously)

More about Mark Twain

New Quote Topic – King Quotes

November 27, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Site News 

Over the weekend I added a new quote topic, king quotes.  You can see all of the king quotes here.  In the meantime here are a few of my favorites:

“All I say is, kings is kings, and you got to make allowances. Take them all around, they’re a mighty ornery lot. It’s the way they’re raised.” ~  The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn by Mark Twain

A well proportioned mind is one which shows no particular bias; one of which we may safely say that it will never cause its owner to be confined as a madman, tortured as a heretic, or crucified as a blasphemer. Also, on the other hand, that it will never cause him to be applauded as a prophet, revered as a priest, or exalted as a king. Its usual blessings are happiness and mediocrity. ~  Return of the Native by Thomas Hardy

“When I am king, they shall not have bread and shelter only, but also teachings out of books; for a full belly is little worth where the mind is starved.” ~  The Prince and The Pauper by Mark Twain






 

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