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5 Quotes About Autumn From Literature

September 23, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

Today is the first day of autumn. To mark the day, here’s a fun collection of five autumnal quotes from literature.

“Draw your chair up and hand me my violin, for the only problem we have still to solve is how to while away these bleak autumnal evenings.” ~ The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

On the motionless branches of some trees, autumn berries hung like clusters of coral beads, as in those fabled orchards where the fruits were jewels. ~ Martin Chuzzlewit by Charles Dickens

It was, as I have said, a fine autumnal day; the sky was clear and serene, and nature wore that rich and golden livery which we always associate with the idea of abundance. The forests had put on their sober brown and yellow, while some trees of the tenderer kind had been nipped by the frosts into brilliant dyes of orange, purple, and scarlet. ~ The Legend of Sleepy Hollow by Washington Irving

The place, with its gray sky and withered garlands, its bared spaces and scattered dead leaves, was like a theater after the performance–all strewn with crumpled playbills. ~ The Turn of the Screw by Henry James

He lowered the window, and looked out at the rising sun. There was a ridge of ploughed land, with a plough upon it where it had been left last night when the horses were unyoked; beyond, a quiet coppice-wood, in which many leaves of burning red and golden yellow still remained upon the trees. Though the earth was cold and wet, the sky was clear, and the sun rose bright, placid, and beautiful. ~ A Tale of Two Cities by Charles Dickens

Autumn Quotes

Autumn Quotes from Literature

Just in time for Halloween – This House Is Haunted

October 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens 

This House is Haunted

I blame Charles Dickens for the death of my father.

So begins This House is Haunted by John Boyne.  While the novel isn’t about Dickens, his name comes up frequently. And those of you that like Dickens’s style of writing are sure to adore this scary tale.

In this novel, reminiscent of  Jane Eyre and The Turn of the Screw,  Eliza Caine accepts the position of governess at Gaudline Hall.  But things are a little off at Gaudline Hall.   The children seem to be all on their own. The people in town seem to know a lot more than they’re telling.  What is it exactly that they’re afraid to say?  Could it relate to the odd feeling that Eliza has about Gaudline Hall?

This is the perfect book for this spooky time of year.

From the moment Eliza rises the following morning, her every step seems dogged by a malign presence that lives within Gaudlin’s walls. Eliza realizes that if she and the children are to survive its violent attentions, she must first uncover the hall’s long-buried secrets and confront the demons of its past. Clever, captivating, and witty, This House Is Haunted is pure entertainment with a catch.

Lost – Season Two

February 26, 2011 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: LitQuotes on TV 

Lost Season Tw0Lost – Season Two, just like all the other seasons,  is filled with so many literary allusions that it’s hard to keep track.   In this season:

  • Ben makes his first appearance claiming to be Henry Gale.  The name is from Dorothy’s uncle in the Wizard of Oz series by L. Frank Baum.   Interestingly enough the last name of Gale is not used in the most famous book in the series, The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.
  • In a major plot point, an orientation video (located on a shelf behind The Turn of the Screw by Henry James) reveals much about the hatch and the Dharma Initiative.
  • Desmond shows fine taste in literature by saying that Our Mutual Friend by Charles Dickens, my favorite Dickens novel, will be the last book that he ever reads.






 

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