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True Seeing Quote by George Eliot

February 10, 2017 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Quote Photos 

After all, the true seeing is within. ~ Middlemarch by George Eliot

Middlemarch by George Eliot

George Eliot (1819-1880)

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50 New Quotes Added

January 24, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Site News 

Quotes from LiteratureFifty new quotes were added to the site today.  All of our quotes list an author and a source. We’re proud that this quotation collection is curated by people and NOT by a computer program.

Here are some quotes from the new additions.

If you need something to worship, then worship life — all life, every last crawling bit of it! We’re all in this beauty together! ~ Dune Messiah by Frank Herbert

The end of religion is not to teach us how to die, but how to live. ~ Agnes Grey by Anne Bronte

“A man’s fate is his own temper; and according to that will be his opinion as to the particular manner in which the course of events is regulated. A consistent man believes in Destiny, a capricious man in Chance.” ~ Vivian Grey by Benjamin Disraeli

“Who, being loved, is poor?” ~ A Woman of No Importance by Oscar Wilde

Life is easy to chronicle, but bewildering to practice. ~ A Room With A View by E. M. Forster

It is a narrow mind which cannot look at a subject from various points of view. ~ Middlemarch by George Eliot

The course of true love never did run smooth. ~ A Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare

 

 

Six Perspective Quotes from Literature

January 12, 2016 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Quote Topics 

Perspective QuotesThink you of the fact that a deaf person cannot hear. Then, what deafness may we not all possess? What senses do we lack that we cannot see and cannot hear another world all around us? ~ Dune by Frank Herbert

Perhaps no man could appreciate his own world until he had seen it from space. ~ A Fall of Moondust by Arthur C. Clarke

The very stone one kicks with one’s boot will outlast Shakespeare. ~ To the Lighthouse by Virginia Woolf

One never can tell from the sidewalk just what the view is to some one on the inside, looking out. ~ Knocking the Neighbors by George Ade

Come what may, I am bound to think that all things are ordered for the best; though when the good is a furlong off, and we with our beetle eyes can only see three inches, it takes some confidence in general principles to pull us through. ~ The Stark Munro Letters by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

Will not a tiny speck very close to our vision blot out the glory of the world, and leave only a margin by which we see the blot? ~ Middlemarch by George Eliot

More Perspective Quotes from Literature

The Book Lover’s Cookbook: Recipes Inspired by Celebrated Works of Literature

April 4, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: LitFood 

Book Lovers CookbookI was browsing through Amazon.com and was happily surprised to find The Book Lover’s Cookbook: Recipes Inspired by Celebrated Works of Literature.  You can be sure that I’ve added it to my wish list!  It combines two of may favorite things, cooking and reading.

Wake up to a perfect breakfast with Mrs. Dalby’s Buttermilk Scones, courtesy of James Herriot’s All Things Bright and Beautiful and Ichabod’s Slapjacks, as featured in Washington Irving’s The Legend of Sleepy Hollow. There’s homey comfort food like Connie May’s Tomato Pie, created with and inspired by Connie May Fowler (Remembering Blue); Thanksgiving Spinach Casserole (Elizabeth Berg’s Open House); and Amish Chicken and Dumplings (Jodi Picoult’s Plain Truth) . . . Sample salads, breads, and such soul-warming soups as Nearly-a-Meal Potato Soup (Terry Kay’s Shadow Song); Mr. Casaubon’s Chicken Noodle Soup (George Eliot’s Middlemarch); and Mrs. Leibowitz’s Lentil-Vegetable Soup (Frank McCourt’s Angela’s Ashes) . . . After relishing appetizers and entrees, there’s a dazzling array of desserts, including Carrot Pudding (Charles Dickens’s A Christmas Carol); Effie Belle’s Coconut Cake (Olive Ann Burns’s Cold Sassy Tree); and the kids will love C.S. Lewis’s Turkish Delight from The Lion, The Witch, and the Wardrobe.

Sprinkled throughout with marvelous anecdotes about writers and writing, The Book Lover’s Cookbook is a culinary and literary delight, a browser’s cornucopia of reading pleasure, and a true inspiration in the kitchen.

Some of the Recipes and the Books that Inspired Them

Jo’s Best Omelette . . . Little Women by Louisa May Alcott
No Dieter’s Delight Chicken Neapolitan . . . Thinner by Stephen King
Extra-Special Rhubarb Pie . . . The Persian Pickle Club by Sandra Dallas
Grand Feast Crab Meat Casserole . . . At Home in Mitford by Jan Karon
Persian Cucumber and Yogurt . . . House of Sand and Fog by Andre Dubus III
Tamales . . . Like Water for Chocolate by Laura Esquivel
Bev’s No-Fuss Crab Cakes . . . Unnatural Exposure by Patricia Cornwell
Macaroni and Cheese . . . The Accidental Tourist by Anne Tyler
Veteran Split Pea Soup . . . The Red Badge of Courage by Stephen Crane
Alternative Carrot-Raisin-Pineapple Salad . . . Midwives by Chris Bohjalian
Summer’s Day Cucumber-Tomato Sandwiches . . . Women in Love by D. H. Lawrence
Refreshing Black Cows . . . The Book of Ruth by Jane Hamilton
Dump Punch . . . Pride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
Not Violet, But Blueberry Pie . . . Charlie and the Chocolate Factory by Roald Dahl
Innocent Sweet Bread . . . The Bluest Eye by Toni Morrison
Daddy’s Rich Chocolate Cake . . . Fatherhood by Bill Cosby

George Eliot (1819-1880)

November 22, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Author Information 

George Eliot

Mary Anne Evans, commonly known as George Eliot, was born on November 22, 1819.   Evans wrote under a male pen name to ensure that her works  would be taken seriously.  At the time it was thought that women authors wrote only lighthearted romances.

Middlemarch, for instance, deals with subjects like the Great Reform Bill, the beginnings of railways and the death of King George IV.  Virginia Woolf once said that Middlemarch, “is one of the few English novels written for grown-up people.”

Other novels by George Eliot include Adam Bede, The Mill on the Floss, Silas Marner,   Romola, Daniel Deronda as well as Felix Holt, the Radical.

Pride helps us; and pride is not a bad thing when it only urges us to hide our own hurts—not to hurt others. ~ Middlemarch by George Eliot

Novels by George Eliot

  • Adam Bede
  • The Mill on the Floss
  • Silas Marner
  • Romola
  • Felix Holt, the Radical
  • Middlemarch
  • Daniel Deronda

More About George Eliot






 

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