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Christmas Quotes from Literature

December 12, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens, Site News 

stocking
It’s beginning to look a lot like Christmas at my house.  The tree is almost decorated.  We’re sending Christmas cards out on Friday and the shopping is progressing nicely.   All of this has put me in the holiday spirit.  So I thought I’d share some of my favorite quotes from the LitQuotes Christmas quotations collection.

Heap on more wood!–the wind is chill;
But let it whistle as it will,
We’ll keep our Christmas merry still.

Marmion by Sir Walter Scott

It is, indeed, the season of regenerated feeling–the season for kindling, not merely the fire of hospitality in the hall, but the genial flame of charity in the heart.
Old Christmas by Washington Irving

“Christmas isn’t a season. It’s a feeling.”
 ~ Roast Beef, Medium by Edna Ferber

“I will honour Christmas in my heart, and try to keep it all the year. I will live in the Past, the Present, and the Future. The Spirits of all Three shall strive within me. I will not shut out the lessons that they teach. Oh, tell me I may sponge away the writing on this stone!” ~  A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

 

LitQuotes Duo – Pimples of the Mind?

December 6, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens 

LitQuotesI had to share today’s LitQuotes Duo.  If you’d like to see more of these, go to the daily quotes page.  There’s a different one every day.

“Diseased nature oftentimes breaks forth in strange eruptions.” ~ Henry IV, Part One by William Shakespeare

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Certain it is that minds, like bodies, will often fall into a pimpled ill-conditioned state from mere excess of comfort, and like them, are often successfully cured by remedies in themselves very nauseous and unpalatable. ~ Barnaby Rudge by Charles Dickens

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Can people suffer from pimples of the mind?

 

Last Month for Dickens Bicentenary Gifts and Gear

December 1, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens 

Don’t miss out! Our Dickens 200th Birthday Gear will only be available through the end of 2012.  This great line of Dickens products includes t-shirts, bags, water bottles and more.

Great Expectations: The Sons and Daughters of Charles Dickens

November 21, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens 

What a great year for books about Charles Dickens! The 200th birthday of the author has seen the publication of some interesting  biographies. The latest, Great Expectations: The Sons and Daughters of Charles Dickens by Robert Gottlieb, hits the bookstores on November 27th.

Gottlieb’s book focuses on the lives of the ten children of Charles Dickens.  (Yep, he had ten children.)  It also touches on a possible child that Dickens had with his mistress, Ellen Ternan.

I haven’t read a review copy, but Publisher’s Weekly has.  In their review of  Great Expectations: The Sons and Daughters of Charles Dickens PW says, “This smart and accessible biography is written in a clever, conversational tone that radiates coziness during even the coldest moments, keeping the pages swiftly turning. ”

Here’s what Amazon has to say about the book:

Charles Dickens, famous for the indelible child characters he created—from Little Nell to Oliver Twist and David Copperfield—was also the father of ten children (and a possible eleventh). What happened to those children is the fascinating subject of Robert Gottlieb’s Great Expectations. With sympathy and understanding he narrates the highly various and surprising stories of each of Dickens’s sons and daughters, from Kate, who became a successful artist, to Frank, who died in Moline, Illinois, after serving a grim stretch in the Royal Canadian Mounted Police.

Each of these lives is fascinating on its own. Together they comprise a unique window on Victorian England as well as a moving and disturbing study of Dickens as a father and as a man.

Go to Amazon.com to buy Great Expectations: The Sons and Daughters of Charles Dickens

10 Funny Quotes from Literature

November 16, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens, Everything Else 

LitQuotesClassic literature can be inspirational.  It can be poetic.  It can be educational.  Classic literature can also be really funny!  Check out these ten funny quotes from literature:

1 – “How dreadful!” cried Lord Henry. “I can stand brute force, but brute reason is quite unbearable. There is something unfair about its use. It is hitting below the intellect.” ~  The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde

2 – “If you could see my legs when I take my boots off, you’d form some idea of what unrequited affection is.”  ~  Dombey and Son by Charles Dickens

3 – Indeed, he would sometimes remark, when a man fell into his anecdotage, it was a sign for him to retire from the world. ~  Lothair by Benjamin Disraeli

4 – You cannot make a man by standing a sheep on its hind-legs. But by standing a flock of sheep in that position you can make a crowd of men. ~  Zuleika Dobson by Sir Max Beerbohm

5 – The bishop did not whistle: we believe that they lose the power of doing so on being consecrated. ~  The Warden by Anthony Trollope

6 – A story with a moral appended is like the bill of a mosquito. It bores you, and then injects a stinging drop to irritate your conscience. ~  Strictly Business by O. Henry

7  – From politics, it was an easy step to silence. ~  Northanger Abbey by Jane Austen

8 – Few things are harder to put up with than the annoyance of a good example. ~  The Tragedy of Pudd’nhead Wilson by Mark Twain

9 – It is not that I object to the work, mind you; I like work: it fascinates me. I can sit and look at it for hours. ~  Three Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome

10 – I don’t want to repeat my innocence. I want the pleasure of losing it again. ~  This Side of Paradise by F. Scott Fitzgerald

If you enjoyed these quotes check out our humorous quotes page or our random funny quote feature.

Ask Srcrooge a Question

November 12, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens 

Scrooge
Our partner site, Charles Dickens Gad’s Hill Place, has a fun feature that you may enjoy.  Go there to ask Ebenezer Scrooge a yes or no question.    And if you’re a Scrooge fan, check out our gift shop for Scrooge clothing, mugs and more.

Darkness is cheap, and Scrooge liked it.
  A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens


Dodger by Terry Pratchett

November 9, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens 

DodgerTerry Pratchett, author of the Discworld novels,  leaves fantasy for a moment to write about Victorian England with Dodger.

As you might guess, the main character of the novel is  based on the Artful Dodger from Oliver Twist.   Dodger is  a young adult who lives by his wits in London.  The story starts out on, pardon the cliché, a dark and stormy night …

A storm. Rain-lashed city streets. A flash of lightning. A scruffy lad sees a girl leap desperately from a horse-drawn carriage in a vain attempt to escape her captors. Can the lad stand by and let her be caught again? Of course not, because he’s . . . Dodger.

Seventeen-year-old Dodger may be a street urchin, but he gleans a living from London’s sewers, and he knows a jewel when he sees one. He’s not about to let anything happen to the unknown girl—not even if her fate impacts some of the most powerful people in England.

From Dodger’s encounter with the mad barber Sweeney Todd to his meetings with the great writer Charles Dickens and the calculating politician Benjamin Disraeli, history and fantasy intertwine in a breathtaking account of adventure and mystery.

Beloved and bestselling author Sir Terry Pratchett combines high comedy with deep wisdom in this tale of an unexpected coming-of-age and one remarkable boy’s rise in a complex and fascinating world.

Dodger by Terry Pratchett

Great Expectations Trailer

October 28, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens, LitQuotes in Movies 

Here’s the trailer for the new Great Expectations movie. The UK release date is November 30th of 2012. I haven’t seen a firm release date for the US as of yet.

Charles Dickens Quote Photo for Halloween

October 20, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens, Quote Photos 

I’ve posted this over at the LitQuotes Facebook page too so that you can more easily share this with your friends.

An evening wind uprose too, and the slighter branches cracked and rattled as they moved, in skeleton dances, to its moaning music. ~ Martin Chuzzlewit by Charles Dickens

Martin Chuzzlewit Quote

Noteworthy Link – The Ghost Club

Noteworthy Link

What do Charles Dickens, Algernon Blackwood, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle and W.B.Yeats all have in common? They were members of The Ghost Club.

The Ghost Club is the oldest organization in the world associated with research of psychic events and issues.   The group was founded in 1862 and exists today. Their website states:

Today the Ghost Club is a non-profit, social club run by an elected Council of volunteers and its purpose remains true to its roots; the Ghost Club offers open-minded, curious individuals the opportunity to debate, explore and investigate unexplained phenomena with like-minded people and record the results for posterity.

 

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