LitQuotes.

LitQuotes Blog

Join Us Pinterest Facebook Twitter

40 Great Quotes from Literature

August 14, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

40 Great Quotes from LiteratureNeed some advice or perspective?  Here are 40 great quotes from literature that may help.  These are some of our favorites from our words of wisdom quote collection.

  1. The mind has many watchdogs; sometimes they bark unnecessarily, but a wise man never ignores their warning. ~ A Fall of Moondust by Arthur C. Clarke
  2. Words spoken cannot be recalled. ~ He Knew He Was Right by Anthony Trollope
  3. People often claim to hunger for truth, but seldom like the taste when it’s served up. ~ A Clash of Kings by George R. R. Martin
  4. Fair speech may hide a foul heart. ~ The Two Towers by J. R. R. Tolkien
  5. It is always the unusual which alarms. ~ The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy
  6. It is not violence that best overcomes hate-nor vengeance that most certainly heals injury. ~ Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
  7. Courage is fire, and bullying is smoke. ~ Count Alarcos: A Tragedy by Benjamin Disraeli
  8. There is nothing either good or bad but thinking makes it so. ~ Hamlet, Prince of Denmark by William Shakespeare
  9. “Words,” said the host, at length, “is worse’n bullets. You never know what they’ll hit.” ~ The Night Horseman by Max Brand
  10. Never forget what you are, for surely the world will not. Make it your strength. Then it can never be your weakness. Armor yourself in it, and it will never be used to hurt you. ~ A Game of Thrones by George R. R. Martin
  11. “When you’ve learned to laugh at the things that should be laughed at, and not to laugh at those that shouldn’t, you’ve got wisdom and understanding.” ~ Anne of the Island by Lucy Maud Montgomery
  12. The fool wonders, the wise man asks. ~ Count Alarcos: A Tragedy by Benjamin Disraeli
  13. “All things are ready, if our minds be so.” ~ Henry V by William Shakespeare
    all things are ready quote
  14. “No one is ever too old to do a foolish thing.” ~ Uncle Silas by J. Sheridan Le Fanu
  15. “Would the world ever have been made if its maker had been afraid of making trouble? Making life means making trouble.” ~ Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw
  16. Cheerfulness, it would appear, is a matter which depends fully as much on the state of things within as on the state of things without and around us. ~ Shirley by Charlotte Bronte
  17. “Just breathing isn’t living!” ~ Pollyanna by Eleanor H. Porter
  18. “Self-love, my liege, is not so vile a sin, As self-neglecting.” ~ Henry V by William Shakespeare
  19. The mind is its own place, and in it self
    Can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven.
     ~ Paradise Lost by John Milton
  20. To be conscious that you are ignorant is a great step to knowledge. ~ Sybil by Benjamin Disraeli
  21. “Next to trying and winning, the best thing is trying and failing.” ~ Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud MontgomeryTrying and Willing Quote
  22. “Nobody can spoil a life, my dear. That’s nonsense. Things happen, but we bob up.” ~ The Forsyte Saga by John Galsworthy
  23. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen nineteen and six, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery. ~ David Copperfield by Charles Dickens
  24. “Do you know anything on earth which has not a dangerous side if it is mishandled and exaggerated? “ ~ The Land of Mist by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  25. The bird that would soar above the level plain of tradition and prejudice must have strong wings. ~ The Awakening by Kate ChopinKate Chopin quote
  26. You cannot make a man by standing a sheep on its hind-legs. But by standing a flock of sheep in that position you can make a crowd of men. ~ Zuleika Dobson by Sir Max Beerbohm
  27. Unwelcome truths are not popular. ~ The Valley of Fear by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  28. “And, above all things, never think that you’re not good enough yourself. A man should never think that. My belief is that in life people will take you very much at your own reckoning.” ~ The Small House at Allington by Anthony Trollope
  29. How quick come the reasons for approving what we like! ~ Persuasion by Jane Austen
  30. Gossip is a sort of smoke that comes from the dirty tobacco-pipes of of those who diffuse it: it proves nothing but the bad taste of the smoker. ~ Daniel Deronda by George Eliot
  31. “The chief proof of man’s real greatness lies in his perception of his own smallness.” ~ The Sign of the Four by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle
  32. She could not explain in so many words, but she felt that those who prepare for all the emergencies of life beforehand may equip themselves at the expense of joy. ~ Howards End by E. M. ForsterExpense of Joy Quote
  33. He has spent his life best who has enjoyed it most. ~ The Way of All Flesh by Samuel Butler
  34. Ignorance is the parent of fear. ~ Moby Dick by Herman Melville
  35. “Its matter was not new to me, but was presented in a new aspect. It shook me in my habit – the habit of nine-tenths of the world – of believing that all was right about me, because I was used to it.” ~ Dombey and Son by Charles Dickens
  36. A man will tell you that he has worked in a mine for forty years unhurt by an accident as a reason why he should apprehend no danger, though the roof is beginning to sink. ~ Silas Marner by George Eliot
  37. The world is a looking-glass, and gives back to every man the reflection of his own face. Frown at it, and it will in turn look sourly upon you; laugh at it and with it, and it is a jolly kind companion; and so let all young persons take their choice. ~ Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray
  38. Old habit of mind is one of the toughest things to get away from in the world. It transmits itself like physical form and feature. ~ A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court by Mark Twain
  39. “We learn from failure, not from success!” ~ Dracula by Bram Stoker
  40. Conventionality is not morality. Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last. ~ Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
    Jane Eyre Quote

Five Quotes About Adventure from Literature

March 16, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

“We are plain quiet folk and have no use for adventures. Nasty disturbing uncomfortable things! Make you late for dinner!” ~ The Hobbit by J. R. R. Tolkien

“Adventurer” — he that goes out to meet whatever may come. Well, that is what we all do in the world one way or another. ~ Allan Quatermain by H. Rider Haggard

His love of danger, his intense appreciation of the drama of an adventure–all the more intense for being held tightly in–his consistent view that every peril in life is a form of sport, a fierce game betwixt you and Fate, with Death as a forfeit, made him a wonderful companion at such hours. ~ The Lost World by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

It is in vain to say human beings ought to be satisfied with tranquillity: they must have action; and they will make it if they cannot find it. ~ Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

By this, he seemed to mean, not only that the most reliable and useful courage was that which arises from the fair estimation of the encountered peril, but that an utterly fearless man is a far more dangerous comrade than a coward. ~ Moby Dick by Herman Melville

See More Adventure Quotes from Literature

Adventure Quotes from Literature

Quotes About Immortality from Literature

March 14, 2015 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Site News 

On March 14, 2015 the Immortality Quotes page was added to LitQuotes.   To be alerted to other changes to the site you can like the LitQuotes Facebook page, follow the  LitQuotes Twitter page or check back with our blog.

So is man’s heart. The desire to perform a work which will endure, which will survive him, is the origin of his superiority over all other living creatures here below. It is this which has established his dominion, and this it is which justifies it, over all the world. ~ The Mysterious Island by Jules Verne

What is it that sometimes speaks in the soul so calmly, so clearly, that its earthly time is short? Is it the secret instinct of decaying nature, or the soul’s impulsive throb, as immortality draws on? Be it what it may, it rested in the heart of Eva, a calm, sweet, prophetic certainty that Heaven was near; calm as the light of sunset, sweet as the bright stillness of autumn, there her little heart reposed, only troubled by sorrow for those who loved her so dearly. ~ Uncle Tom’s Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe

You know nothing about Hope, that immortal, delicious maiden forever courted forever propitious, whom fools have called deceitful, as if it were Hope that carried the cup of disappointment, whereas it is her deadly enemy, Certainty, whom she only escapes by transformation. ~ Daniel Deronda by George Eliot

“Reputation, reputation, reputation! O, I have lost my reputation! I have lost the immortal part of myself, and what remains is bestial.” ~ Othello by William Shakespeare

“So much has religion done for me; turning the original materials to the best account; pruning and training nature. But she could not eradicate nature: nor will it be eradicated ’till this mortal shall put on immortality.” ~ Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Quotes about Immortality

 

Freedom Quotes from Literature for the Fourth of July

July 3, 2014 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

Freedom Quotes

I hope you all have a fun and safe Fourth of July!!  To commemorate the day, here are five quotes about freedom.

Peril, loneliness, an uncertain future, are not oppressive evils, so long as the frame is healthy and the faculties are employed; so long, especially, as Liberty lends us her wings, and Hope guides us by her star. ~ Villette by Charlotte Bronte

She had not known the weight until she felt the freedom! ~ The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne

“You know, there are two good things in life, freedom of thought and freedom of action.” ~ Of Human Bondage by W. Somerset Maugham

“Liberty is worth paying for.” ~ 20,000 Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne

“I am no bird; and no net ensnares me; I am a free human being with an independent will.” ~ Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

See Entire Collection of Freedom Quotes

 

 

Just in time for Halloween – This House Is Haunted

October 17, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Charles Dickens 

This House is Haunted

I blame Charles Dickens for the death of my father.

So begins This House is Haunted by John Boyne.  While the novel isn’t about Dickens, his name comes up frequently. And those of you that like Dickens’s style of writing are sure to adore this scary tale.

In this novel, reminiscent of  Jane Eyre and The Turn of the Screw,  Eliza Caine accepts the position of governess at Gaudline Hall.  But things are a little off at Gaudline Hall.   The children seem to be all on their own. The people in town seem to know a lot more than they’re telling.  What is it exactly that they’re afraid to say?  Could it relate to the odd feeling that Eliza has about Gaudline Hall?

This is the perfect book for this spooky time of year.

From the moment Eliza rises the following morning, her every step seems dogged by a malign presence that lives within Gaudlin’s walls. Eliza realizes that if she and the children are to survive its violent attentions, she must first uncover the hall’s long-buried secrets and confront the demons of its past. Clever, captivating, and witty, This House Is Haunted is pure entertainment with a catch.

Conventionality is Not Morality Quote Photo

September 12, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Quote Photos 

Conventionality is not morality. Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last. ~ Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Here’s a quote I’ve always loved.   Feel free to share this with others. I’ve also posted this on the LitQuotes Facebook page as well as the LitQuotes Google Plus page to make that easier.

ConventionalityShare

Happiness Quote from Jane Eyre

August 13, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Quote Photos 

“I would always rather be happy than dignified.” ~ Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

Charlotte Bronte Quote Photo

Ten Noteworthy Quotes – Words of Wisdom From Books

April 19, 2013 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

20130419booksMorning made a considerable difference in my general prospect of Life, and brightened it so much that it scarcely seemed the same. ~  Great Expectations by Charles Dickens

“Self-love, my liege, is not so vile a sin, As self-neglecting.” ~  Henry V by William Shakespeare

“Would the world ever have been made if its maker had been afraid of making trouble? Making life means making trouble.” ~ Pygmalion by George Bernard Shaw

The mind is its own place, and in it self
Can make a Heaven of Hell, a Hell of Heaven.
 ~ Paradise Lost by John Milton

“Next to trying and winning, the best thing is trying and failing.” ~ Anne of Green Gables by Lucy Maud Montgomery

The world is a looking-glass, and gives back to every man the reflection of his own face. Frown at it, and it will in turn look sourly upon you; laugh at it and with it, and it is a jolly kind companion; and so let all young persons take their choice. ~ Vanity Fair by William Makepeace Thackeray

Conventionality is not morality. Self-righteousness is not religion. To attack the first is not to assail the last. ~ Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte

“We learn from failure, not from success!” ~  Dracula by Bram Stoker

It is a fair, even-handed, noble adjustment of things, that while there is infection in disease and sorrow, there is nothing in the world so irresistibly contagious as laughter and good-humour. ~  A Christmas Carol by Charles Dickens

“This above all,–to thine own self be true; and it must follow, as the night the day, thou canst not then be false to any man.” ~  Hamlet, Prince of Denmark by William Shakespeare

View All Words of Wisdom Quotes

 

Five Classic Novels Combined With a Touch of Horror

October 2, 2012 by · Leave a Comment
Filed under: Everything Else 

In honor of Halloween I put together this list of five classic novels that have been rewritten with a different twist.  What happens when classic literature crosses with the horror genre?  You get titles like . . . .

Jane SlayerJane Slayre, our plucky demon-slaying heroine, is a courageous orphan who spurns the detestable vampyre kin who raised her, sets out on the advice of her ghostly uncle to hone her skills as the fearless slayer she’s meant to be. When she takes a job as a governess at a country estate, she falls head-over-heels for her new master, Mr. Rochester, only to discover he’s hiding a violent werewolf in the attic–in the form of his first wife. Vampyres, zombies, and werewolves transform Charlotte Bronte’s unforgettable masterpiece into an eerie paranormal adventure that will delight and terrify.

 

Zombies

“It is a truth universally acknowledged that a zombie in possession of brains must be in want of more brains.”

So begins Pride and Prejudice and Zombies, an expanded edition of the beloved Jane Austen novel featuring all-new scenes of bone-crunching zombie mayhem. As our story opens, a mysterious plague has fallen upon the quiet English village of Meryton—and the dead are returning to life! Feisty heroine Elizabeth Bennet is determined to wipe out the zombie menace, but she’s soon distracted by the arrival of the haughty and arrogant Mr. Darcy. What ensues is a delightful comedy of manners with plenty of civilized sparring between the two young lovers—and even more violent sparring on the blood-soaked battlefield.

 

Heathcliff: Vampire of Wuthering Heights starts with a mysterious letter.  Lockwood, a law clerk in London and amateur vampire stalker, must investigate, no matter the peril to himself. Traveling into the misty moors of Yorkshire, Lockwood finds the strange owner of Wuthering Heights, Heathcliff, and becomes trapped in the evil enveloping all of Yorkshire. Driven nearly to madness by his unrequited love for Catherine Earnshaw, Heathcliff roams the moors and is transformed into one of the undead, a vampire. But when he returns to claim his beloved, he finds that she too is forever changed and cannot become one of the undead.  Heathcliff begins a cycle of madness that might satisfy his blood lust, but never his heart’s desire. Now he reveals the history of carnage and revenge to his most unwilling listener and next victim…

 


 

Grave Expectations

Heaven knows, we need never be ashamed of our wolfish cravings. . . .

In Grave Expectations bristly, sensitive, and meat-hungry Pip is a robust young whelp, an orphan born under a full moon. Between hunting escaped convicts alongside zombified soldiers, trying not to become one of the hunted himself, and hiding his hairy hands from the supernaturally beautiful and haughty Estella, whose devilish moods keep him chomping at the bit, Pip is sure he will die penniless or a convict like the rest of his commonly uncommon kind.  But then a mysterious benefactor sends him to London for the finest werewolf education money can buy.

 

Sea MonstersSense and Sensibility and Sea Monsters expands the original text of the beloved Jane Austen novel with all-new scenes of giant lobsters, rampaging octopi, two-headed sea serpents, and other biological monstrosities. As our story opens, the Dashwood sisters are evicted from their childhood home and sent to live on a mysterious island full of savage creatures and dark secrets. While sensible Elinor falls in love with Edward Ferrars, her romantic sister Marianne is courted by both the handsome Willoughby and the hideous man-monster Colonel Brandon. Can the Dashwood sisters triumph over meddlesome matriarchs and unscrupulous rogues to find true love? Or will they fall prey to the tentacles that are forever snapping at their heels? This masterful portrait of Regency England blends Jane Austen’s biting social commentary with ultraviolent depictions of sea monsters biting. It’s survival of the fittest—and only the swiftest swimmers will find true love!

« Previous Page



 

LitQuotes